Friday, June 17, 2011

XXOO

Big thank you to PZ Myers and everybody visiting today to say such nice things about my son's blog. Art is thrilled to know there are so many people out there who care about the subject matter and appreciate the fact that he writes a science blog. Cheers! 


It may look like a mess, but I believe it's "organized."

28 comments:

  1. I think it's great. I want to encourage my 5 year old nephew to do something similar. Keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Heya, new fan here from New Zealand. :)

    I have a 2 1/2 year old son, and it would be really cool if he could do something like this one day.

    Love your work,

    Denise

    ReplyDelete
  3. Greets from Australia! Very nice blog, I am learning something :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well that settles it, I'm never having a kid. In comparison to this, anything they would do would just be a disappointment.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I've added your blog to a list for my 2nd graders next year.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is very well researched and informative, great job.

    ReplyDelete
  7. You are awesome. Please never give up your passion for ancient life. I am 32 years old and I am learning a lot from your posts.

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is really good work. The facts are clear and interesting and really shows your passion for the subject. Keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Terrific! I'll be checking back often!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Good on you Louise, and the boy of course.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wonderful! You're on my Google Reader now.

    You really need a "Follow" button. (You can get it from Blogger.)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Another fan in Alaska, and my 7-year old grandson liked this too!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Très Cool.

    Encountered your blog via an @assassingrl tweet, saw a comment from Denise in NZ, what a small world we are beginning to live in.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi ABC,

    Greetings from Germany. You have a nice blog!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi again ABC,

    here are two creatures you might be interested in, they both look weird enough and one is from the Burgess Shale and was only recently published.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthrozanclus
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halkieria

    Lee

    ReplyDelete
  16. Great blog! Added to my RSS reader. I hope my little 15 month old daughter will be that smart one day :-)
    One new fan from Germany

    ReplyDelete
  17. Amazing blog!

    Thanks for sharing your interest with everyone.

    Nance

    ReplyDelete
  18. Greetings from Brooklyn, New York. Great blog!

    Arthropods are cool.

    ReplyDelete
  19. @Susannah Thanks! My mom added a follow button.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks everybody!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  21. @Lee : And Halkieria seems to be a relative of Wiwaxia.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Greetings from Manitoba, Canada! First of all, allow me to chime in with these others to say how awesome this project is. I'm a bit of a paleo-fan myself, though I'm not very up to speed on the Burgess Shale formation yet. Great work!

    Have you made it to many of the great fossil museums and sites around this continent yet? My Wife and I recently went on our second Dinosaur Tour together to check out some great places. So far our favourites are the Wyoming Dinosaur Centre in Thermopolis, WY and the Royal Tyrrel Museum in Drumheller, AB (Canada).

    On our last trip, one of the books we picked up was called 'Cruisin the Fossil Freeway.' It's got a lot of really neat information and some amazing artwork. If you haven't seen it yet, I recommend you take a look! It's got a lot of really cool fossils and talks about where they can be found. Maybe you'll be going on your own fossil tour someday?
    http://www.amazon.com/Cruisin-Fossil-Freeway-Scientist-Ultimate/dp/1555914519

    Keep up the great work!
    -Dave from Canada

    ReplyDelete
  23. I suddenly stopped weeping for the future. You are an inspiration! If I had kids I would make them read your blog for sure. When I was little, I loved (and still love) dinosaurs and all the life that led up to them. I look forward to new posts in my subscription service. Go to it, kiddo!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Good work! I haven't heard of most of the critters described here before. It's always good to learn about something new and different, especially in a field as fascinating as paleontology.

    Here in Ithaca, NY, we're surrounded by Devonian shale. My husband and I do a lot of fossil collecting, and like to try identifying what we find. One of the fossils we've run across, while we can put a name to it, remains a mystery with regards to what it was like in life: Plumalina plumaria.

    http://www1.newark.ohio-state.edu/Professional/OSU/Faculty/jstjohn/Cool%20Fossils/Plumalina.htm

    Do you like mysteries? There are a lot of weird critters out there!

    -woodsong

    ReplyDelete
  25. I am a Chinese living in Holland. I found your blog through PZ Myers' blog. I am really amazed. Go ahead, young man, tell us more abour this wonderful world you have discovered.
    I will definitely ask my kids to read your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi ABC, greetings from Costa Rica. I also found your blog through PZ Myers.

    Is great to see this blog. I think what you are doing is awesome. Keep the good work. :D

    Regards

    ReplyDelete
  27. @woodsong Thanks for telling me about Plumalina plumari. It could have acted like a Sea Pen and anchored itself to the sea floor and stuck up like a plant.

    ReplyDelete